Lima UMADAOP 2021 Fall Conference

UMMADAOOP UMOJA: UNITY Urban Minority Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Outreach Program 32ND ANNUAL FALL CONFERENCE 2021

LETTER From MYRTLE Boykin-lighton

Director of Mental Health Recovery Services Board Tammy Colon

FEDERATION Donald Christian PRESIDENT OF

road to recovery & the light of love Michael colyar’s

CONTENTS INTERESTED IN MORE FROM UMADAOP?

UMADAOP of Ohio, Inc. 32nd Annual Conference Fall 2021

To learn more about our resources for living a healthy lifestyle, contact one of our many locations throughout the state of Ohio:

Akron UMADAOP

(330)379-3467

4 . MYRTLE BOYKIN-LIGHTON

Cincinnati UMADAOP

(513)514-7099

Cleveland UMADAOP

6 . AGENDA FOR CONFERENCE

(216)361-2040

Columbus UMADAOP

(614)227-9694

8 . PRESIDENT OF FEDERATION

Dayton UMADAOP

(937)276-2176

Hispanic UMADAOP

10 12 16 20 24 26 28 30

. AWARD RECIPIENTS

(216)459-1222

Lima UMADAOP

. COACH POWELL

(419)222-4474

Lorain UMADAOP

(440)246-4616

. MICHAEL COLYER

Mansfield UMADAOP

(419)525-3525

Lucas County UMADAOP

.ONAJE SALIM

(419)255-4444

Youngstown UMADAOP

(330)743-2772

. TAMMY COLON

. MR. MALLORY

. THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS

. FEDERATION DIRECTORY

UMADAOP Magazine is published by 608 Publishing & Graphics 2801 International Ln Madison, WI Copyright 2020 by 608 Publishing & Graphic. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusions in magazines of newspapers, or limited excerpts strictly for personal use. Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved.

32nd Annual UMADAOP Statewide Conference September 15-17, 2021

The 32nd Annual UMADAOP Statewide Conference will be held Wednesday, September 15 - Friday, September 17, 2021, at the Lima Civic Center, hosted by Lima UMADAOP. Our theme, Umoja: To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race, our families, our neighborhoods, and our communities - speaks to our commitment to ensuring that communities of color across Ohio benefit from culturally specific prevention, treatment, recovery and mental health services. The UMADAOP Federation of Ohio was established in 1979, the result of legislation championed by former State Representative William L. Mallory. With support from former Ohio State Senator William F. Bowen and State Representative Ray Miller, a network of providers was developed to ensure that communities of color would have access to prevention, treatment, recovery and mental health services. This year’s conference features sessions on addressing health disparities, advocacy, recovery and treatment, intersectionality, working with communities of faith and much more! Register at: https://32ndannualumadaopconference.eventbrite.com

Myrtle Boykin- Lighton CEEO htt CEO

T hank you for your participation in the 32nd annual UMADAOP’s of Ohio Federation Conference.

Our Theme is UMOJA “Unity” To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race, our families, our neighbourhoods, and our communities - speaks to our commitment to ensuring that communities of color across Ohio benefit from culturally specific prevention, treatment, recovery and mental health services. There is power in unity and together we can create a movement that brings tangible change and creates a future of hope. The UMADAOP Federation of Ohio has experienced a rich history of growth, and in many instances been the forefront in introducing new avenues to treatment in Ohio and change to how treatment services are delivered. We will forever be grateful for that network of providers that supported our vision and ensured that the vision was carried out. The annual conference just continues our long tradition of ensuring that communities across Ohio benefit from effective change, culturally specific prevention, treatment, recovery and mental health services. The UMADAOP Federation of Ohio was established in 1979, the result of legislation championed by former State RepresentativeWilliam L. Mallory. With support from former Ohio State SenatorWilliam F. Bowen and State Representative RayMiller, a network of providers was

developed to ensure that communities of

color would have access to prevention, treatment, recovery and mental health

services.~~~~~This year’s conference hosted by the Lima UMADAOP, features sessions on addressing health disparities,

advocacy, recovery and treatment, intersectionality, and working with communities of faith. Moreover, in celebration of National Recoverymonth we’re pleased to present two nights of entertainment: Nationally known comedian and Actor Michael Colyar, Locale comedian Kool Keith Cook and theWilliamBrady Band God Bless and enjoy Best Regard,

Myrtle Boykin-Lighton, CEO

4

“There is power in unity and together we can create amove- ment that brings tangible change and creates a future of hope.”

5

AGENDA

Wednesday, September 15 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. General Session Open: Myrtle Boykin Lighton, Lima UMADAOP Invocation: Greetings: Lori Cris, Director, OhioMHAS Philip D. Atkins, PhD, LICDC-CS, OCPC, Executive Director, Mental Health & Recovery Board of Union County Welcome: Sharetta Smith, Chief of Staff, City of Lima Introduction of the Speaker: Myrtle Boykin Lighton, Lima UMADAOP Keynote: Using Your Voice Speaker: Ohio State Representative Paula Hicks Hudson (D-44) Break 10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Workshop Session One 10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Workshop 1A Addressing Client Resistance: Recognition and Processing Presenter: Michael Johnson Workshop 1B Mental Health Awareness – Signs, Symp- toms and the Impact of Stigma Presenter: Ayme McCain, Director of Prevention and Community Engagement for Recovery Resources Workshop 1C The Role of Key Stakeholders in the Battle Against Suicide in the Black Community Presenter: Kamesha Spates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology Department of Sociology, Kent State University Break 12:15 – 12:30 p.m. Luncheon / Keynote September 15, 2021 | 12:30 p.m. Greetings: Myrtle Boykin Lighton, Lima UMADAOP Blessing of the Meal: Reggie Coley, Lima UMADAOP Introduction of Speaker: Myrtle Boykin Lighton, Lima UMADAOP Speaker: Brandon Johnson Keynote: Pulling Back the Layers: How Racism and Dis- crimination impacts Suicide Prevention Workshop Session Two September 15, 2021 | 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Workshop 2A: Working with your County Mental Health and Addiction Board Presenter: Philip D. Atkins, PhD, LICDC-CS, OCPC, Executive Director, Mental Health & Recovery Board of

Union County

Workshop 2B What, Why, and How: Three questions of the Prevention Credentialing process Presenter: Jennifer Benson, B.A., OCPC, ICPS, Ohio Certi- fied Prevention Consultant Workshop 2C Gambling and the Community Based Process Presenter: George A. Hicks III OCPC, ICPS Break 3:30 – 3:45 p.m. Workshop Session Three 3:45 – 5:15 p.m. Workshop 3A Trauma Informed Family Engagement Presenter: Rejeana Haynes, LISW-S Workshop 3B The importance of listening to our youth Presenter: LaShanna Alfred Workshop 3C Clinical Justice” For Black Men & Boys in The Age of Mass Incarceration and Mass Trauma Presenter: Jewel Woods, MA, MSW, LISW-S, Founder and Clinical Director of Male Behavioral Health, LLC General Session Keynote: September 16, 2021 | 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. Greetings: Marcell King, Lima UMADAOP Introduction of the Speaker: Marcell King, Lima UMADA- OP Speaker: Dr. Steve Perry Topic: Cause and Cure Break 10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Workshop Session Four September 16, 2021 | 10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Workshop 4A Ain’t Nothing Wrong With Him Presenter: Alfred “Coach” Powell Workshop 4B Diversity and Strategies for Culturally Adapt- ing Evidence-Based Interventions Presenter: Charde’ Hollins, Relevant Connections, LLC Workshop 4C Evidence vs. Culture: Advocating for Cultural- ly-Responsive Interventions

6

Presenter: Simone Crawley, Principal Consultant, Crawley Cultural Consulting Break 12:15 - 12:30 p.m. Luncheon/Keynote: Septem- ber 16, 2021 | 12:30 – 1:45 p.m. Greetings: Marcell King, Lima UMADAOP Introduction of the Speaker: Marcell King, Lima UMA- DAOP Speaker: Haner Hernandez, Ph.D., CPS, CADCII, LADCI Workshop Session Five September 16, 2021 | 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Workshop 5A Diversity and Strategies for Culturally Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions Presenter: Charde Hollins, Owner and Lead Consultant, Relevant Connection Workshop 5B Advocacy in Prevention Presenter: JP Dorval, Division of Community Engage- ment, Columbus City Council Workshop 5C Ethics in Prevention Pt. 1 Presenter: Jennifer Benson, Ohio Certified Prevention Consultant Break: 3:30 – 3:45 p.m. Workshop Session Six September 16, 2021 | 3:45 – 5:15 p.m. Workshop 6A Faith Leaders’ Panel: Role of Faith and Spirituality in Creating a Blueprint for Community Healing Panel: Pastor Daniel Hughes, moderator; Dr. Brian LaMont Monford, Sr., Senior Pastor, Philippian Baptist Church, Lima; Bishop Duane C. Tisdale, Senior Pastor, Friendship Baptist Church, Toledo, OH; and, Ward Workshop 6B Medication Assisted Treatment from a clinician and medical perspective Presenters: Dr Treymor Sepabohdi, Medical Director, Lima UMADAOP and LaShawnda Boykin, M.A.T., Lima UMADAOP Workshop 6C Ethics in Prevention Pt. 2 Presenter: Jennifer Benson Workshop Session Seven September 17, 2021 | 9:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Workshop 7A Helping Others From An Inter- sectional Frame- work

Presenter: Dr. Tyf- fani Monford Dent Workshop 7B Words Matter: Changing the Language of Addiction Presenter: Lynette Cashaw Davis Closing: Arvee Carter, Board Chair, Lima UMADAOP Presentations: Myrtle Boykin Lighton and Marcell King, Lima UMADAOP Closing Keynote: Addressing Youth violence from a community perspective Speaker: Alfred “Coach” Powell

7

President of Federation Donald Christian

D ear Conference Participants, those who are with us and those who have joined us virtually, On behalf of the Ohio Federation of UMADA- OPS and the Lima Conference Host I bring you Greetings and wishes for a safe and produc- tive conference experience. This year’s conference will offer excellent Training and Information provided by an awesome team of presenters.

8

We all have and continue to en- dure the devastating dispropor- tionate impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic, the scourge of the opiate epidemic and unjustified violence inflicted on members of our community, But like our ancestors before us we have shown resiliency, cour- age and the will to take care of our own. The UMADAOPS of Ohio have been at the forefront for over 40 years in providing competent and culturally appropriate Pre- vention, Treatment and Sup- portive services to members of communities of color and their families.

It is our hope that the knowl- edge and information gained at this conference will equip you to continue to provide the legacy of service reflected in the UMADA - OPS Mission and Purpose. I would like to extend a heart- felt Thank you to Myrtle Lighton and the Lima UMADAOP Staff for putting together this excellent program and for the generous hospitality that they will demon- strate throughout this Confer- ence.

In, Love, Peace and Community

Donald Christian President, UMADAOP Federation of Ohio

“I would like to extend a heartfelt Thank you to Myrtle Lighton and the Lima UMADAOP Staff for put- ting together this excellent pro- gram and for the generous hos- pitality that they will demonstrate throughout this Conference .”

9

UMADAOP Pandemic Hero Essential Workers Award AWARDS AWA AWARDS AWAR AWARDS AWA AWARDS AWA AWARDS AWA

Chris Stewart, MSW - Reentry Coordinator, ODRC Office of Reentry, Lima Region Adult Parole Authority

Mary Monford - Miz Paw Center

Judge Glenn Derryberry – Allen County Juvenile Court

Judge Richard Warren – Lima Municipal Court/ retired Allen County Common Pleas Court Judge

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

LeAndre Johnson - Fresh and Faded

Mrs. Phyllis Minor (Winkie) - Children’s Advocate

Warren Pughsley - Fire Fighter and Community Mentor

Mike Hood - Spencer Township Trustee

Shaunta Grier LPN

Marcus & Warwick Goodwin - House of Emmanuel

Yolanda Drake. - JTC Cook

Phil Adkins - Executive Director of MHRSB of Union County

Ivan Ballard, Recovery Coach

Jannie Springer receptionist

Minister Bruce Monford Mary Alice’s House

Taundra Ezell, Community Liaison

Reggie Coley - Clinical Director Jill Ackerman - Lima City School Superintendent

LaJune McFerren, Volunteer

Josie Clark – Children’s advocate

Faith Based Resolutions

Pastor Damien Tibbs – New Life Christian Ministries

Pastor Doug Hengstebeck – Lima First Church of the Nazarene Pastor Lamont Monford Sr. – Philippian Missionary Baptist Church Pastor Daniel Hughes - Incline Missional Community Church and Amos Project (community organizer)

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation WilliamMallory Leadership Award

The award is presented in honor of former Ohio State

Duane C. Tisdale Friendship Missionary Baptist Church

Legislator William Mallory of Cincinnati. The award

Pastor Ward- 2nd Baptist Church

recognizes a person or an organization that has

Pastor Taylor Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church

demonstrated a leadership role in advancing causes that

signi cantly impact the quality of life in communities of

color throughout the State of Ohio.

Recipient: Sharetta Smith, Chief of Staff, Office of Mayor – City of Lima

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation Director’s Exemplary Staff Award The UMADAOP Director’s Exemplary Staff Award is

presented to a UMADAOP employee who demonstrates

exemplary dedication to advancing the mission and vision of

the UMADAOP Program.

Recipient: Darryl Clarke

10

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation Miguel A Prieto Hispanic Leadership Award Named for the founder and incorporator of the Hispanic ARDS AWARDS! RDS AWARDS! ARDS AWARDS! ARDS AWARDS! ARDS AWARDS!

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation The Willie Lighton Milestone Award This award is given to an individual who has committed and shown excellence in his/her professional career. This individual provides service and dedication to the community as well as the UMADAOP Federation. The Willie Lighton Milestone award illustrates a professional determined to make community service a way of life, mentor newer professionals to the field while leading by example. The Willie Lighton Award is presented to an individual who has the ability to work with youth, criminal justice, treatment prevention and recovery services. Recipients: LaShawnda Boykin & Jay Simpson

UMADAOP, the award recognizes individual or organization for their outstanding contribution to furthering the mission

of the Hispanic UMADAOP through their profession and

achievement and leadership while improving the quality of life in the Hispanic Community Recipient: Tony Rios, Executive producer of Voces Latinas TV Show in Toledo, Ohio UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation Helen Postell Excellence Award Named for the founder and incorporator of the Hispanic UMADAOP, the award recognizes individual or organization for their outstanding contribution to furthering the mission

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation JoAnn Woods Administrative Excellence Award

Award Named for JoAnn Woods, the former Administrative Assistant

to the Cincinnati UMADAOP. The award is presented to the

of the Hispanic UMADAOP through their profession and

UMADAOP assistant who supports the mission and

achievement and leadership while improving the quality of life in the Hispanic Community Recipient: Tony Rios, Executive producer of Voces Latinas TV Show in Toledo, Ohio

operations of the organization with the same grace, pride and commitment exempli ed by JoAnn Woods. Recipient: Margaret Levesque

UMADAOP Annual Awards Presentation African American Leadership Award The award is presented to a person or an organization that demonstrates commitment to improving the level of wellness

of African American communities by developing or

implementing exemplary behavioral health services or other

related services.

11

Recipient: She’Rays & Associates

The Impact of generational trauma and its role in the lives of Young Men of Color. Coach Powell

12

Coach Powell’s Bio Founder and CEO of Human Motivation Council and Human Motivation Circle, Professor Alfred “Coach” Powell is an internationally celebrated motivational and inspirational speaker, author, lecturer, certified Master Life Coach, and workshop facilitator. He’s a dedicated community educator, change agent, and social activist who effectively lectures from the “halls of education to the walls of incarceration.” Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor at the School of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, Center for Culturally Competent Education and Training, State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is the Youth Director/Coordinator for the “Counseling and Treating People of Color: An International Perspective.”

He is the Youth Director/Coordinator for the “Counseling and Treating People of Color: An International Perspective.”

This annual conference draws educators, health care providers, social workers, counselors and service providers from the U.S., Bermuda, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean; Teacher Transformation Coach and Student Advocate Instructor. Conducts personal development trainings, including: classroom management; positive collaborative relationship building between teachers and students.

“He’s a dedicated community educator, change agent, and social activist who effectively lectures from the “halls of education to the walls of incarceration.”

13

A Rooted History:

Concerns Among CovidVaccines in the Black Community

DON’T THINK IT DOESN’T AFFECT YOU. 14

Millions watched as a Black intensive care nurse in Queens, New York received the first dose in the country of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

On a mid-December Monday in 2020, the Unit- ed States recorded a coronavirus death toll topping 300,000. The 10th month of lockdown restrictions brought record low numbers of holiday travel for family visits, continued effects of economic stress both on federal and inde- pendent levels and the compounding difficulty of students receiving virtual instruction. Mil- lions watched as a Black intensive care nurse in Queens, New York received the first dose in the country of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Though a leading name among vaccine production, the Pfizer vaccine has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. News reports also detailed side effects that occurred following some of the initial administrations of the vac- cine in various parts of the country. While these facts produced hesitation or questioning about the safety of the vaccine among many, the Black community had a greater amount of reluctance to consider. Now nearly three months into countrywide vaccine distribution, doses are going to groups of healthcare workers and employees in fields with higher risks of transmitting the virus. A report from a data tracker through the CDC stated more than 60% of these doses have gone to white people, whereas only 6% have gone to African Americans. While demographics and varying vaccination phases throughout states are factors that contribute to this disparity, historical events and patterns are perhaps the greatest factors that account for this significant differ - ence. In 1932, in partnership with the Tuskegee Insti- tute, the U.S. Public Health Service recruited hundreds of rural Black men to participate in a study they were told would treat them for “bad blood,” an all-encompassing term at the time that referenced a span of conditions and ailments. Officially named the Study of Untreat - ed Syphilis in the Negro Male, the goal was to “observe the natural history of untreated syphi- lis” among Black populations. The study’s partic- ipants, however, were not provided the scope of these intentions and were denied the education

or resources that could give them the knowl- edge needed to make informed decisions about their participation. During the study, the men were given free meals, medical exams and burial insurance. They were not aware, however, the purpose of the study was to deny them medical treatment during the process. Instead of lasting the six months it initially prom- ised, the study continued for 40 years. Penicillin was widely introduced as an antibiotic to treat syphilis in 1947, yet it was not offered to the study’s participants. They were also not given the option to halt their involvement in the study and receive treatment if desired. When a federal advisory board was called in to assess the ethics of the study, the panel found the men had been misled and the study was “ethically unjustified.” A year later, settlements and reparations were distributed. However, the hindsight perspective of the study reflects a trusted group of govern - ment medical researchers intentionally omitting vital information from a group of men either seeking treatment or volunteering to participate in a study they believed would lead to the treat- ment of syphilis. Now nearly 50 years later, as a pandemic shakes the globe, the Black community is reminded of the injustices of that experiment. A host of Black educational and medical leaders across the coun- try have voiced their support of the coronavirus vaccine and are encouraging African Americans to receive it. While some say the continued rise of vaccination numbers will assuage concerns, a justified amount of anxiety around the doses is still present for many.

15

Michael Colyar’s ~Road to Recovery and the Light of Love~

W henever we consider recovery from addiction we tend to imagine a long, fearful path filled with personal hardship and pain. Often this path of our fearful imagination is one we’d much rather detour at almost any cost. If we needed a reliable roadmap to navigate this fearsome march, however, it might be difficult to imagine a recovery path more perilous and painful than the incredible life journey of Comedian, Actor, Author, Host and Playwright, Michael Colyar. And yet Michael’s

road to recovery is one that’s been filled with the light and love of his deep faith in his personal understanding of God, along with his profound creative passion to share his story, and share his boundless joy with all his brothers and sisters at the beginning of their “ Michael has spent a lifetime lovingly sharing his comedic gifts with a multitude of diverse communities in desperate need of his brand of humor. ”

own recovery journey. From his very humble beginnings in Chicago’s Robert Taylor Homes to his long reign as California’s comedy “King of Venice Beach”, all theway tohis present evolution as a whirlwind of creative comic energy and multi-media entertainment dominance, Michael has spent a lifetime lovingly sharing his comedic gifts with a multitude of diverse communities in desperate need of his brand of humor. And of course, always and lovingly spreading the laughter too.

16

recently write and currently star in his One-Man play, “Michael Colyar’s Momma”, the step-by-step journey of his long road to and through addiction and then into the light and love of true faith, true love, and finally lasting recovery. His journey has been long and his faith unwavering on his path to professional success, personal fulfillment and perhaps that most precious of all possible reward’s- His opportunity to share his story with all in need of light and love. As he often shares- “Your Word is Your Wand!” Our gift is our chance to now listen to and be inspired by the words of one who’s been there and back, and faithfully brought the generous spirit of love and hope to give to us here and now.

COMEDIC LEGEND MICHAEL COLYAR

Yes, Michael has spent decades bringing that most healthy of prescriptions to all in need- The Laughs! The shortest list of his professional accomplishments would require a long, long scroll, but among his many highlights we must include- His roles in the groundbreaking TV sitcoms- “Martin” and “Blackish” His film roles in “House Party III” and “The Princess & The Frog” His leading role in “Holiday Heartbreak” (currently available on BET+) His current role as Host of the daily YouTube talk show- “The Michael Colyar Morning Show” on YouTube. Yet—as Michael himself will passionately make clear—all of his creative work has flowed through his faith in his loving God, and has arrived as a direct result of this faith as filtered through the creative vision he’s followed every step of his journey to recovery. Of course, at present our entire world is in even greater need of the relief, release and recovery that both real comedy and real motivation offer us as we struggle to weave through shifting waves of global uncertainty. And this is why Michael has recommitted himself once again to sharing his recovery hope through his active role as a speaker and mentor with a vast lifetime of experience we can all relate to on the most human of levels. In conjunction with his speaking and mentoring outreach, Michael has also dovetailed his creative vision with his fellowship commitment to

17

TOOLKIT

 RECOVERY MONTH 

RECOVERY IS FOR EVERYONE: Every Person, Every Family, Every Community

 RECOVERY MONTH  r

WWW.NATIONALRECOVERYMONTH.ORG

18

2021 National Recovery Month Observance

“RECOVERY IS FOR EVERYONE”

R ecovery is for everyone because it benefits everyone. In recovery, we build new connections to ourselves, our families, and our communities. The 2021 National Recovery Month theme, “Recovery is for Everyone: Every Person, Every Family, Every Community” reminds people in recovery and those who support them, that recovery belongs to all of us. We are all called to end gatekeeping and welcome everyone to recovery by lowering barriers to recovery support, creating inclusive spaces and programs, and broadening our understanding of what recovery means for people with different experiences. While it may be tempting to characterize recovery as a universal experience or single journey, our community is proof that there are as many pathways to and of recovery as there are people. Our strength is our diversity and because of who we are, the recovery community has unique opportunities to learn, challenge, grow, and dream. By expanding traditional, limited conceptions of recovery, which center white, heterosexual, cisgender, religious, wealthy perspectives, we enrich everyone’s experience. Mental health and substance use disorder are not one-size-fit all conditions, nor do they affect everyone equally. Culturally competent multilingual resources and gender-expansive programs acknowledge and include LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning), BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), and other historically marginalized community members.

Looking beyond our individual experiences strengthens and supports recovery in all its forms. The recovery community has a powerful foundation of mutual aid, peer support, and adaptability. As we grow in empathy and understanding, we save lives by adding protective factors and building resiliency. We honor the incredible contributions from communities within recovery as groups connect and implement resources that serve their unique needs. The powerful bonds built in recovery are life-altering. To honor those bonds, in every form they take, is a significant factor in sustaining recovery as well as building bridges between our communities. When we connect with open minds and hearts, we learn from one another and create life-saving opportunities. To heal ourselves, our communities must also heal. Recovery Research Institute conducted a nuanced, five-year study that explored the ways in which substance use disorder impacted families, communities, and cultures, and how recovery in those spaces created opportunities to rebuild. The study affirmed that people in distressed communities need opportunities to share their experiences, therefore, personal recovery can translate into collaborative recovery when the individual begins to see their story as part of a larger story. The shift from “I” to “we” is transformative. We call to nurture this “we.” We find new ways of connecting the recovery community. We call to rejuvenate struggling communities and families. At the same time, we work to empower communities who grapple with inequitable conditions, including the effects of systemic racism, homophobia, transphobia, generational poverty, adverse childhood experiences, and other forces. Social connections, family support, and neighborhood relationships are directly linked to wellness and recovery. We must ensure that everyone has the same chance at recovery. Our “I” must become our “we.”

19

Onaje Salim

D r. Salim is a nationally certified and state licensed behavioral health clinician who provides leadership to a team of dedicated federal employees in managing key operations within CSAP, including budget formulation and execution, policy coordination, and national advisory council management. He has previously served as a Contract Officer Representative in the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) Co-Occurring and Homeless Activities Branch, Team Leader in the Division of Pharmacologic Therapies, Chief of SAMHSA’s Executive Correspondence Branch, Director of CSAT’s Division of State and Community Assistance – Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant Program, and interim roles as both the Acting Deputy Director of SAMHSA’s Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ) and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT). Salim has been recognized for his leadership as chairperson of SAMHSA‘s Achieving Career Excellence (ACE) Fellows Program, a cohort-based employee development program. He is also a 2016 graduate of the HHS- Senior Executive Service (SES) Candidate Development Program. His recent publication credits include SAMHSA’s Treatment Improvement Protocol 59, Improving Cultural Competence (2014), a journal article, Peer Recovery Support for Individuals with SUDs: Assessing the Evidence, Psychiatric Services (2014), as an expert reviewer of the comprehensive U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol Drugs, and Health (2016), and contributor 20

to the SAMHSA National Mental Health and Substance Use Policy Laboratory’s 2019 Guidebooks: Use of Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder in Criminal Justice Settings; Use of Medication- Assisted Treatment in Emergency

Departments; a 2020 Guidebook: Evidence Based Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders; and a 2021 Guidebook: Substance Use Disorders Recovery with a Focus on Employment and Education.

21

Populations Among Black Why COVID-19 Are Rates Higher

A report from the CDC in April 2020 found that 33% of patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 were Black, although Black people made up only 18% of the studied population. Pre- existing conditions such as diabetes, asthma, hypertension and obesity disproportionately impact the African American commu- nity and heighten one’s risk of becoming susceptible to the vi- rus. These conditions also increase the chance of complications if the virus is contracted. Evidence has shown that structural inequities in social as- pects, like poverty and access to healthcare, play a determining role in one’s overall health and quality of life. Racial minority groups are often especially vulnerable to these changes due to fewer available resources compared to other groups. This leads to an increased risk of not receiving proper healthcare that is crucial in the time of a global pandemic. A report from the CDC listed a variety of factors that are steady contributors to inequalities that expose minority groups to higher risks of seeing the effects from the virus. Discrimination, a lack of access to healthcare, wealth gaps and housing limita- tions are only some of the inequities that plague many Black communities. As discrimination affects countless areas of life, its existence in systems designed to provide care and life-saving support can be deadly. In healthcare systems, it decreases or revokes stan- dards of quality care. When paired with lower rates of insurance

among Black communities, as compared to their white coun- terparts, access to quality care becomes nearly nonexistent. COVID testing, vaccines and care during hospitalization can become extremely expensive and prevent someone in need of care from pursuing treatment. As disparities of income and educational levels are present between racial groups, one’s ability to leave a job that is put- ting them at risk for contracting the virus is lessened, whereas someone with a higher paying job may be in a financial po - sition that gives them more flexibility to leave that job. Bus drivers, train operators and custodians are overrepresented by people in the Black community. These are essential jobs that often require long hours and do not offer adequate health benefits to offset gaps in accessing affordable healthcare and treatments. While conclusive results have not been finalized to show if efforts to quell these disparities have been effective, many governmental and healthcare agencies are making targeted attempts to address some of these healthcare gaps. Some lo- cal initiatives are offering increased hours at testing sites to account for employees working jobs outside of the standard 9-5 schedule. Eliminating the underlying causes of disparities in wealth, healthcare and education would be instrumental in shaking these effects but will require years of dedicated work from community organizations and lawmakers at all levels.

22

This leads to an increased risk of not receiving proper healthcare that is crucial in the time of a global pandemic

Racial minority groups are often especially vulnerable to these changes due to fewer available resources compared to other groups

23

Colon Tammy Director of Mental Health Recovery Services Board

T o eachof youattending this conference I send my regrets that I am unable to spend time with you. I am, however, excited that this opportunity is being offered in Lima, Ohio, during a time when the behavio- ral health system needs it. This conference: Umoja: To strive for and maintain uni- ty in the family, community, nation and race, represents the very philosophy needed for our people and country to heal and prosper. T he Mental Health and Recovery Ser- vices Board of Allen, Auglaize and Hardin Coun- ties has partnered with Lima UMADAOP for many years. Their mission to provide cul-

turally appropriate preven- tion services to African and Hispanic American com- munities, compliments the mission of the MHRSB. As we live through the ongoing ef- fects of the pandemic, the recognition of health dis- parities, and the dissention of our people, we are also living through a profession- al shortage of behavioral health providers. While we work hard to increase the number of behavioral health providers available to our people in need of behavioral health services and support, we are equally responsible to ensure that we are provid- ing these opportunities for individuals who represent our minority communities to advance our system of care to its greatest capacity.

“This conference: Umoja: To strive for andmain- tain unity in the family, community, nation and race, represents the very philosophy needed for our people and country to heal and prosper.”

24

“ I am confident you will enjoy your learning opportunity, the people you will meet, and Lima. Much appreciation for all that you do and your commitment to do more.

I am grateful that the Urban Minority Alco- holism and Drug Abuse Outreach Program of Lima is providing you an excel- lent conference providing the opportunity to acquire the tools and resources nec- essary for professional de- velopment, leadership, and accountability. The oppor- tunity for each of you to sur- roundyourselfwith informed leaders and one another will strengthen all of us in our at- tempt to respond to our ever changing and challenging society. UMADAOP has a rich history of ensuring that minority communities’ ben- efit from culturally specific prevention, treatment, and recovery and mental health services necessary to help advance our systemof care. T he minority centered philosophy of treat- ment and education has never been more valu- able than now, as we work to deliver a care model that extends beyond the tradi- tional models and to find innovative ways to reach particularly vulnerable communities related to be- havioral and mental health.

More than ever there is a call for strong leadership, differ- ently than at any other time in our history, to bring vision and purpose to our minority and diverse communities. T oday’s leaders must manage multiple gen- erations of workers with values, interests, and needs that often are in direct conflict. We need leaders and providers who embrace the broad vision of equi- ty and inclusion and says “here’s where we are going to go, here’s why we need to go there, and here’s how we are going to get there.” We need leaders and pro- viders to believe that health disparities are an injustice because they limit the abil- ity of certain social groups to function optimally in OUR society. I am confident you will enjoy your learning opportunity, the peo- ple you will meet, and Lima. Much appreciation for all that you do and your com- mitment to do more.

25

26

6

7 27

Thank YOU DONORS Lima UMADAOP sincerely thanks our sponsors and supporters for supporting our mission and making the Annual Conference possible! Become a sponsor or supporter today by calling 419-222-4474.

28

The Beacon Recovery House for men is excited and proud to be an investment supporter of the 32nd an- nual UMADAOP Conference. It is with great pleasure that we in honor of the late Willie Lighton, who estab- lished the Beacon House in 2018 to provide safe sober housing for men struggling with addiction, Beacon House has worked in connection with Lima UMADAOP providing housing to patients leaving treatment. We appreciate your business!

SheRay’s & Associates is excited and proud to be a sponsor of the 32nd annual UMADAOP Conference. SheRay’s & Associates, L.L.C. provides consulting services to non-profit, faith based, community or - ganizations and governmental entities in developing and implementing technical assistance and training service in an innovative and practical format. We ap- preciate your business!

419-304-4075 / becaonrecoveryhouse@gmail.com

https://sherays.com/

Stolly Insurance Group is excited and proud to be a sponsor of the 32nd annual UMADAOP Conference. Stolly Insurance Group is committed to providing outstanding insurance protection to our clients while delivering superior customer service. As a full-service independent insurance brokerage, we specialize in finding the right insurance for you. We represent doz - ens of different companies, so whatever your needs are, we will be able to pair you with the best policy for you, whether it be business, personal, health, life, and more. We appreciate your business!

The TTJ Group is excited and proud to be a spon- sor of the 32nd annual UMADAOP Conference. TTJ Group, LLC promotes public health by collaborating with communities to create and provide innovative and culturally appropriate services on a national level. We are equally excited for the opportunity to work with your organization to implement the workshops & trainings. We appreciate your business!

https://stolly.com/

https://ttjgroupllc.com/

29

4

5

CONTACT LIMA UMADAOP (419) 222-4474 311 E Market St 3rd Floor, Lima, OH 45801 limaumadaop.com

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

Powered by