New Vision Magazine

NEW VISION HOUSE OF HOPE

Top 10 HBCUs by graduation rate College COMPLETION

Black History Celebrating

The Increasing Influence Of America’s BLACK VOTE

THE FIRST OF MANY KAMALA HARRIS:

Cover Art “Music Lesson I” by Colin Bootman

NEW VISION HOUSE OF HOPE

CONTENTS

CHARLES CULVER

Kamala Harris The First of Many 06 Sam, SSVF Outreach Coordinator 18 The Value of an HBCU Experience 32

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34 46 50 64

Best College Rankings 12 Rankings

PAUL PEER SUPPORT SPECIALIST

College Completion .

The Increasing Influence of America’s Black Vote

SYLVESTER WILLIAMS & QUANTUM LAB

A History of the African American Barbershop

NEWVISIONHOUSEOFHOPE.ORG

NEWVISIONHOUSEOFHOPE.ORG

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ABOUT Since its inception in 2003, New Vision House of Hope, Inc. (NVHOH) has helped thousands of men and women change their lives; born out of a sincere concern for and commitment to Maryland’s low- income and underserved communities. Founder and President, Charles Culver, Sr., has trusted God to guide his path forward, as he diligently worked to reach those struggling with addiction, homelessness, mental health challenges, HIV/AIDS, or recently released from incarceration. New Vision House of Hope envisions a world where there is no homelessness; health equity for all is a reality; and it serves as the premier advocate for individuals in need of critical supportive services. All of its programs are designed for the purpose of achieving these noble goals.

LEILA PEER RECOVERY HOUSE MANAGER

EARL TRANSITIONAL HOUSE MANAGER

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CHARLES CULVER JR. SENIOR CASE MANAGER

NEW VISION HOUSE OF HOPE

Enter Safely.

Call: 410.466.8558

300 E. Lombard St, Suite 1000 Baltimore, MD 21202

Visit In Person:

Visit Online: newvisionhouseofhope.org

N ew V ision S ervices: • Transitional Housing • Substance Abuse Outpatient Therapy • Mental Health Services • Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF)

E merge STRONG.

Kamala Harris: The First of Many

Dressed in a purple coat and ensemble and with pearls around her neck, Kamala Harris stood beside the podium with her right hand on the Bible. A smile was pressed onto her lips as she waited to repeat the phrases of her oath of office as the newly elected vice president of the United States. She was both the first woman and Black woman to stand in that position. Born in Oakland, California to parents who emigrated from India and Jamaica, Harris grew up in the environ- ment of advocacy. Her parents were justice advocates and often brought her to demonstrations during the Civ- il Rights Movement. At a young age, she was introduced to activists like Constance Baker, Charles Hamilton Houston and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. She has said these individuals were role models whose work furthered her interest in attending law school. She boasts educational accomplishments and graduated from Howard University and the University of California’s Hastings College of Law. Once in her career, Harris became the first Black woman to serve as the district attorney for the county of San Francisco. In 2017, she was elected to the Senate and was only the second Black woman to serve in that position. Through her work, Harris has backed and sponsored legislation supporting criminal justice reform, an- ti-lynching and policies benefitting women and young girls. In her first speech as vice president-elect in No- vember 2020, she said she hopes to inspire and encourage other women across the country to shatter the barriers surrounding them in school, work and politics. “While I may be the first woman in this office, I won’t be the last because every little girl watching tonight sees that this is a country of possibilities.” During her initial campaign, Harris became one of only 11 Black women in the history of the United States to run for president. Though none of them won their

political races, the representation and historic events of their campaigns often encouraged minority voter registration and created valuable points of inspiration and progress for women and African Americans. Harris tailored her running points to Black Americans and con- sistently underlined her Jamaican and Indian roots.

“We did it, Joe. We did it.”

When she accepted Joe Biden’s request to join his campaign as vice president, she further opened a path that had been previously uncharted for minority groups across the country. “We did it, Joe. We did it,” she said after learning of their victory. While the iconic words signaled the end to efforts to win the election, they were a celebration of progress for the women, Black Ameri- cans and other minority groups who later watched the reaction. All throughout her campaign and the election, Kama- la Harris’ first name was often mispronounced, raising questions of how to enunciate the syllables containing the Indian meaning of “lotus flower.” Many Black men and women could identify with having names over which native English tongues would stutter. Hearing her name spoken correctly, however, in front of an audi- ence of the country’s top politicians and to the ears of millions of Americans on inauguration day solidified the tone of representation and respect Harris, her role models and activist predecessors have advocated for.

My mother would look at me, and she’d say, ‘Kamala, you may be the first to do many things, but make sure you are not the last. That’s why breaking those barriers is worth it. As much as anything else, it is also to create that path for those who will come after us. - Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States “ ”

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D ear friends, Over the past year, the nation and the world have faced unprecedented challenges due to the global pandemic. Countless non-profit organizations that respond to the needs of vulnerable citizens have struggled to keep their doors open; many have shut down after years of service. I feel truly blessed that New Vision House of Hope, Inc. was not one of them. Indeed, because of our solid financial footing, dedicated staff and managers, trusted relationships with government agencies and partner organizations, and the continuing support from reliable grant sources, this program is stronger than ever. This report reflects the fine work that we do to improve lives, reconnect families, and rebuild communities. Since our founding in 2003, we have not wavered from our commitment to professionalism, compassionate care, and accountability. New Vision House of Hope, Inc. is truly a beacon of light in Baltimore City. And, in Charles CULVER

the years to come, we will continue to light the way for those seeking hope and help to recover, rebuild, and rejoin the world as positive and productive members of society. I am honored to lead this effort. Sincerely, Charles Culver, Sr. Founder & President New Vision House of Hope, Inc.

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The Role of Social Media in

For years, the use of social media has been on an exponential rise. A study from the Pew Research Center estimates more than 70% of adults in the U.S. are active users of social media plat- forms like Tik Tok, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. These out- lets have served as avenues for self-expression, unity and sharing of ideas. For Black people around the country, they have been a place to share resources and encourage Black progress and suc- cess. In May of last year, following the killing of George Floyd, Pew conducted an analysis of tweets and found nearly nine million posts contained the “BlackLivesMatter’’ hashtag in that month alone. The use of other hashtags supporting the movement also grew exponentially as investigations began for the cases of Bre- onna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks and Ahmaud Arbery. On June 2, well over 28 million pictures of black squares flooded social me- dia timelines. Many of them were posted solely with the hashtag “BlackoutTuesday.” The squares were intended to show gestures of solidarity for justice following the recent shootings and acts of police brutality.

As users follow people and accounts on social media, they tai- lor their experience to consuming content they consider relat- able, useful or inspirational. Posts about hair products for Black hair, Black-owned products and businesses, wealth and finan- cial advice, healthy relationships and awareness for racial justice events are among some of the widely-shared topics. Pew reported in 2020 that 55% of Black social media users between the ages of 18 and 49 posted at least one picture that year showing support of a cause related to racial justice and equality. The study also found that 60% of Black users interact with social media to find other people who share their views about important political or social issues, compared to 39% of white users. At a time when promotions are half the task of running a busi- ness, social media provides a space for free marketing with cre- ative strategies based on a company’s individual needs. In the world of social media, outside of sponsorships, creativity ranks higher than monetary resources, giving both Black and white businesses equal opportunities for exposure. As the resources for knowledge and financial assistance are often limited among

Furthering Black Progress

Black businesses, an active social media profile can provide some compensation for this disparity. A study from the Center for Media and Social Impact sug- gested these outlets help “level a media playing field dominated by pro-corporate, pro-government and anti-Black ideologies.” Advertising through these platforms allows for consistent expo- sure as users like, share and comment on posts without having to purchase products. Customers can also tag their favorite brands in their posts and stories, instantly bringing new eyes to these products. These platforms also serve as a hub of knowledge and expe- Pew conducted an analysis of tweets and found nearly nine million posts contained the “BlackLivesMatter’’ hashtag in that month alone.

rience for people wanting to start businesses. Owners post content, respond to direct messages and host live videos an- swering viewers’ questions about specific topics. This creates an accessible source of discussions and resources to address specific needs within the Black community from those with current experience. Just as social media has brought greater attention to world- wide protests and demonstrations around racial justice, a comparable amount of attention has been placed on the ex- cellence that thrives daily in Black communities. It provides people, especially the younger generation, with an outlet for expressing their identities that may be partially concealed throughout their everyday lives as they mix with a predomi- nantly white society. Pictures show fashion trends inspired by 90s Black culture. Videos show daily routines for wellness and fitness habits. And written posts and captions provide mo- tivational insights on approaching and living in the current political climate. This all exists alongside humorous posts that bring temporary relief from the stresses encountered through

DESPITE IT ALL, PAUL HAS THRIVED; PROUD OF HIS NEW POSITION AS MANAGER OVER ALL THE NEW VISION HOUSE OF HOPE MEN’S RECOVERY HOUSES, AND GRATEFUL FOR THE CONFIDENCE THE COMPANY HAS IN HIM TO DO THE JOB. “

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PAUL

PEER

SUPPORT Specialist P aul, a Washington D.C. native, always knew his

overwhelming. Despite it all, Paul has thrived; proud of his new position as manager over all

potential. Unfortunately, past poor choices took him away from his family and friends for a large part of his life. However, he never gave up on his dreams. Choosing to enter the New Vision House of Hope program was the first step towards finally realizing them. His ascension from client to positions of leadership within the organization, was not easy. Taking care of one’s own recovery, as well as serving as a role model, authority figure, and company employee can sometimes feel

“...HE NEVER GAVE UP ON HIS DREAMS. CHOOSING TO

the New Vision House of Hope men’s recovery houses, and grateful for the confidence the company has in him to do the job. New Vision House of Hope poured into Paul all the things that he was missing. It is with these resources and opportunities that he is on the path to a truly successful life full of meaning, hope, purpose, and boundless possibilities.

ENTER THE NEW VISION HOUSE OF HOPE PROGRAM WAS THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS FINALLY REALIZING THEM.”

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CONTACT US TODAY! newvisionhouseofhope.org

300 E. Lombard St, Suite 1000 Baltimore, MD 21202 410.466.8558

Populations Black Why COVID-19 Are Rates Among Higher

A report from the CDC in April 2020 found that 33% of patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 were Black, although Black people made up only 18% of the studied population. Pre- existing conditions such as diabetes, asthma, hypertension and obesity disproportionately impact the African American commu- nity and heighten one’s risk of becoming susceptible to the vi- rus. These conditions also increase the chance of complications if the virus is contracted. Evidence has shown that structural inequities in social as- pects, like poverty and access to healthcare, play a determining role in one’s overall health and quality of life. Racial minority groups are often especially vulnerable to these changes due to fewer available resources compared to other groups. This leads to an increased risk of not receiving proper healthcare that is crucial in the time of a global pandemic. A report from the CDC listed a variety of factors that are steady contributors to inequalities that expose minority groups to higher risks of seeing the effects from the virus. Discrimination, a lack of access to healthcare, wealth gaps and housing limita- tions are only some of the inequities that plague many Black communities. As discrimination affects countless areas of life, its existence in systems designed to provide care and life-saving support can be deadly. In healthcare systems, it decreases or revokes stan- dards of quality care. When paired with lower rates of insurance

among Black communities, as compared to their white coun- terparts, access to quality care becomes nearly nonexistent. COVID testing, vaccines and care during hospitalization can become extremely expensive and prevent someone in need of care from pursuing treatment. As disparities of income and educational levels are present between racial groups, one’s ability to leave a job that is put- ting them at risk for contracting the virus is lessened, whereas someone with a higher paying job may be in a financial po - sition that gives them more flexibility to leave that job. Bus drivers, train operators and custodians are overrepresented by people in the Black community. These are essential jobs that often require long hours and do not offer adequate health benefits to offset gaps in accessing affordable healthcare and treatments. While conclusive results have not been finalized to show if efforts to quell these disparities have been effective, many governmental and healthcare agencies are making targeted attempts to address some of these healthcare gaps. Some lo- cal initiatives are offering increased hours at testing sites to account for employees working jobs outside of the standard 9-5 schedule. Eliminating the underlying causes of disparities in wealth, healthcare and education would be instrumental in shaking these effects but will require years of dedicated work from community organizations and lawmakers at all levels.

This leads to an increased risk of not receiving proper healthcare that is crucial in the time of a global pandemic

Racial minority groups are often especially vulnerable to these changes due to fewer available resources compared to other groups

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This program works,

I’m living proof ”

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NEWVISIONHOUSEOFHOPE.ORG

SSVF Outreach Coordinator S am is passionate about his work. The U.S. Army veteran and current New Vision House of Hope SSVF Outreach Coordinator, takes pride in his ability to meet veterans where they are in life. He intimately understands the struggles that come with being homeless and the challenges that confront those who have recently been released from incarceration, because he has experienced the same. Thankfully, Sam wanted better for himself. The Bronx, New York native entered the New Vision House of Hope program, worked hard, and turned his life around. His efforts, character and gregarious personality did not go unnoticed. For the past three years, he has used his straight talk approach to successfully engage and assist hundreds of veterans in the Baltimore area who are either homeless or in jeopardy of becoming so. Securing housing, however, is not the ultimate goal. Sam and the New Vision House of Hope SSVF staff seek to help clients become stable enough to stand on their own two feet so that they can lead productive and meaningful lives. By sharing his own story, he provides evidence that it is possible. SAM

“He intimately understands the struggles that come with being homeless and the challenges that confront those who have recently been incarcerated...”

“For the past three years, he has used his straight talk approach to successfully engage and assist hundreds of veterans in the Baltimore area who are either homeless or in jeoprady of becoming so.”

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NEWVISIONHOUSEOFHOPE.ORG

GET PRIVATE ADDICTION TREATMENT & DETOX GET PRIVATE ADDICTION TREATMENT & DETOX GET PRIVATE ADDICTION TREATMENT & DETOX We have specialized programs that can start with detox through to rehabilitation. We have specialized programs that can start with detox through to rehabilitation. We have specialized programs that can start with detox through to rehabilitation. CALL: 410.466.8558 Visit: Newvisionhouseofhope.org Come to: 300 E. Lombard St, Suite 1000 Baltimore, MD 21202 20

A Place to Heal

• Caring and compassionate

staff committed to out clients’ success • Safe and clean living environment • Goal driven case management • Individual treatment and housing plans • Substance abuse relapse prevention counseling • Mental health monitoring and referrals • Supportive team living environment • Quality support groups and workshops • Ryan White oral health services

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THE STORY OF Sylvester Williams &

Quantum Laboratory

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ONE 1 Of

1ONE CREATING A Of

Man

Experience

FOUNDER & CEO Sylvester Williams 24

A s a nation of immigrants, many of us come from the humblest of beginnings in search of our own particular American dream. The vast majority work hard to reach even modest success yet we still continue to painstakingly carve out our foundations for the next generation to follow. And then there are those few of us who achieve on a scale that creates a beaming beacon of shining light for all to see. Founder and CEO of Quantum Laboratory, Sylvester Williams, would be a prime example of this light.

committed discipline, a realization that had been honed over the previous summer’s toil in his first factory job. Hard factory labor had also convinced the young man that he must take the wheel of his future if he were to go anywhere other than straight back to his factory’s timeclock. Yet HS football success would not immediately transfer to gridiron glory as the JCHS graduate would find himself entirely unrecruited by any major program and with very limited options for any collegiate football career and education at all. Yet here

As a child of working class parents

who toiled long and hard to improve their family’s opportunities, young Sylvester was a gifted athlete—with size, strength and speed to spare—who dreamed of an NFL career upon entering Jefferson City High School. The headstrong teenager was indeed dreaming big but also temporarily ignoring the lessons of his hard working parents until he stumbled into his first major hurdle—a sophomore suspension due to neglected academics. Yet this adolescent misstep led to his first crucial understanding in how to both pivot and realign his goals.

he found himself prepared to bootstrap his way forward. Determined to make an athletic impact on his own, young Mr. Williams got into his first car and drove himself to Kansas and Coffeeville Community College to reboot his football career. After tremendous Juco success in his freshman year however, the defensive lineman found himself, again, unrecruited by any D-1 programs. And so it was back to his car for a long drive to the renowned University of North Carolina where he would bet big on himself and tryout as a true

and entirely unheralded “walk-on”.

His HS football coach spotted his obvious potential and encouraged him to switch sports and give the hard lessons of the gridiron a go. The junior year Mr. Williams heeded that call then quickly realized that both his athletic and academic work ethic would require the much needed addition of

After quickly establishing himself as an invaluable force on the UNC defense, the rapidly maturing Mr. Williams continued to redouble both his academic

Continue Reading On Next Page>>>

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ONE 1 Of 1 ONE CREATING A Man Of CONTINUED Experience

“ Instead of simply a group of talented “employees” working on their own goals and agendas, we always strive to create a true family and put in the work every day, together. Because I believe that inclusive work wins together.”

Continue Reading Below...

and athletic efforts, completing his degree in Communications and going on to become a 2013, 1st round draft pick of the Denver Broncos. What followed was one definition of hard work paying off, and the All-American dream come true. After 2 years of stellar play— and some tough NFL playoff seasoning—Mr. Williams and his Broncos team would go on to win 2016’s Super Bowl 50! Years of NFL success would follow before Mr. Williams returned to his beloved Broncos to finally call it a career. And then it was time to pivot and realign again. Q UANTUM L ABORATORY IS C REATED TO S ERVE While many former NFL players elect to either cash in on their fame or rest on their hard-earned laurels Mr. Williams chose instead

to enter the private sector with service to his community in mind. After honing his business skills in both trucking and real estate, in 2019 he founded Quantum Laboratory as the St. Louis area’s first minority-owned CLIA certified clinical laboratory. The primary goal was simple-- to bring advanced diagnostic testing to underserved communities—and, of course, the need was evident. Although Quantum’s services are comprehensive, the compelling need to tackle the complexities of a worldwide pandemic became the priority, and serving a community filled with understandable apprehension was the immediate challenge. But here Mr. Williams applied some of the most successful lessons he’d learned in the NFL to his new Quantum team.

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In recent conversation he shared- “You know in my 2013 rookie year we had a very talented team…and then we got blown out in the 1st round of the playoffs. In 2015 we had a very talented team also, but now we’d become a family. With our Quantum team it’s the same. Instead of simply a group of talented “employees” working on their own goals and agendas, we always strive to create a true family and put in the work every day, together. Because I believe that inclusive work wins together.” As CEO, Mr. Williams strongly believes that this idea of family as applied to his community is what sets both Quantum’s services and its outreach apart. Driving a One- of-One service forward into the future is something he knows is a constant challenge but it’s a challenge that he understands will build a stronger, healthier tomorrow for all of us.

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Creating a Business that Serves the Community B ecause proper professional healthcare is always vital for all.

PRESIDENT

Jason Griffin

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C hallenges are a major reality of our human condition. A great deal of our humanity shines through when we’re tested and it’s safe to say that—as fellow human beings sharing our world together—we’ve all been tested in these most recent years. The very best of us have met our health challenges head on and worked hard to help solve our health crisis. As President of Quantum Laboratory, Jason Griffin has met that challenge and lead his team to the solutions we

all need to move forward. Mr. Griffin began his journey in 2004 at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff when he graduated with his degree in Business Management and immediately got to work in the home healthcare industry where he enjoyed great individual success for over eight years. It was then that family called and requested his professional experience and expertise in getting their burgeoning trucking company off the ground and running. Their soon booming trucking concern eventually segued into establishing a real estate business which focused on housing for lower income families within their community. As a growing family business, Mr. Griffin then seized an opportunity to reenter the health space in 2019 when he and brother-in-law Sylvester Williams created Quantum Laboratory to both fill an evident community need and to provide the highest level service to underserved communities and families most in need of that very specific service.

C oaching is a leadership position that requires you to first develop a plan. -Jason Griffin

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O ftentimes our community doesn't have many people who look like them, offering this type of absolutely vital service where it's most needed.

Creating a Business

that Serves the Community CONTINUED...

Within the greater St. Louis area, Quantum Laboratory immediately set their mark on their primary mission and everyday goal- “Bringing advanced diagnostic testing to underserved communities in need.” Of course when the pandemic hit the world hard, Mr. Griffin and Quantum Laboratory were perfectly poised and positioned to tackle the unique challenges we were all suddenly suffering through. As a former Track and Field Head Coach at the Collegiate School of Medicine and Bioscience, now Mr. Griffin is even more firmly convinced of sharing the vital lessons in leadership he both taught and learned during his coaching tenure with his new Quantum Laboratory team. In recent conversation, President Griffin shared his thoughts- “Coaching is a leadership position that requires you to first develop a plan, then put that plan into action with your team fully onboard, and to always be ready to create that team mentality within the most diverse setting.” Given Quantum Laboratory’s professional mission and commitment, Mr. Griffin eagerly shoulders the great responsibility of providing service to many of St. Louis’ most underserved communities and also fully understands that the diversity of his Quantum team is itself of service to many.

Moving forward, President Griffin sees both national and international expansion of Quantum Laboratory’s services as the next logical step yet also keeps a steady course on their professional priorities- · Remain close to Quantum’s team/family/staff · Remain family-oriented in foundation and action

· Continue to reach our goals

· Always keep our eyes on improving our service.

Our constant human reality is that challenges will always present themselves but with Mr. Griffin and Quantum Laboratory, every community can safely trust that we’re ready to meet those challenges with commitment and confidence.

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Kiari E

By Ndeh Anyu

G rowing up in the Midwest, I never knew about historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). One day, during my junior year in high school, my assistant principal pulled me aside and told me something I didn’t quite understand at the time: “Will, you can have a college experience, or you can have an HBCU experience.” Neither of us knew it, but his words would forever change my life. I was shocked and amazed when I set foot on the campus of North Carolina Central University (NCCU) for the first time. Up to this point in my life, I had never seen so many educated Black people. Students walked with a sense of purpose and integrity, and they spoke with an elegance that was foreign to me. In them, I saw future doctors, lawyers, educators, business people, philanthropists and change agents.

The energy emanating from campus literally gave me chills as I envisioned myself becoming part of this community. The landscape of success at NCCU was the direct opposite of what I observed growing up in Minneapolis. As I became involved in the NCCU community, I also began to realize my purpose. Whereas my goal in Minneapolis was to merelysurvive, my purpose at NCCU was to thrive. Here I had the opportunity to sit and learn from Black professors; I could walk the yard and witness Black people hosting discussions about Black liberation, politics, educational reform, stock trading and everything else under the sun. I was amazed to learn that great scholars and activists such as John Hope Franklin, LeRoy T. Walker and Zora Neal Hurston had once taught engaging and inquisitive minds at NCCU. Change agents such as Julius L. Chambers, Maynard Jackson, G.K. Butterfeild, Herman Boone and 9th Wonder once walked the same campus I now called home.

Brought to you by: diverseeducation.com

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It was fascinating to learn the history of how a local pharmacist, who had a dream and a vision, created what would become one of the top HBCUs, according to US News and World Report. Moving halfway across the country from Minneapolis to Durham, North Carolina, was a culture shock. At first, I was filled with fear about the thought of leaving my family and friends. But when I arrived at NCCU, I quickly found friends that I consider family today. I became a part of communities I never thought possible. I went from being a kid who never thought much of himself to a man who saw the world as his oyster. During my sophomore year, I became a member of an organization called the Centennial Scholars Program (CSP), which is a brotherhood of men

who come from all walks of life but who all have the same end-goal in mind: being successful. Through this organization, I found brothers who shared my ambitions — men who decided their lives would not be dictated by their pasts, but instead by what they envisioned becoming. Our mentors were the most significant part of the organization. They went above and beyond their professional obligations. When we as a cohort struggled educationally, mentally or emotionally, they were there. When we succeeded inside and out of the classroom, they were present. When we needed a shoulder to cry on because of problems outside our control, they listened. Through CSP, I found a sense of belonging and decided higher education was what I was called to do.

Editoral

Will, you can have a college experience, or you can have an HBCU experience.

Toward the end of my junior year, I started planning for life after NCCU. Up to this point, my trajectory had been leading me toward a path in law. As a child, I had envisioned myself becoming an attorney who fought for others. I imagined working day and night to ensure my clients would receive the best possible legal counsel I could provide. But midway through my senior year something changed. At this point, our current chancellor was leaving, and I was selected to sit on the committee to pick the next leader of NCCU. Throughout this process, I began learning about the various facets of a university. It was captivating to discover how drastically different academic affairs was from student affairs, even as they depended upon one another. Similarly, I was amazed to learn that the way an institution is funded dictates how different departments are financed.

Being able to see the intricacies of such institutional mechanisms while on this search committee further encouraged me toward charting a path in the direction of higher education. After completing two degrees at NCCU, I am now fortunate enough to not only work at the University of Pennsylvania through the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, but I will also begin a new journey toward attaining my doctorate in higher education here at Penn this upcoming fall. In many ways, I consider NCCU my Mecca. It was at this extraordinary place I learned to tap into my potential. I learned not only about myself, but also about people from all walks of life; I engaged with individuals who practiced different religions, but we knew we were all one and the same. I was mentored by great visionaries who remain paramount to me till this day. But most of all I found my purpose — and for that I will forever be grateful.

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BEST COLLEGES RANKINGS #72 (TIE) IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES #69 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS #1 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Founded in 1881 as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, we became

Spelman College in 1924. Spelman College, a historically Black college and a global leader in the education of women of African descent, is dedicated to academic excellence in the liberal arts and sciences and the intellectual, creative, ethical, and leadership development of its students. Spelman empowers the whole person to engage the many cultures of the world and inspires a commitment to positive social change.

350 SPELMAN LANE SW, ATLANTA, GA 30314 | (404) 681-3643 WWW.HAMPTONU.EDU BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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BEST COLLEGES RANKINGS

#124 (TIE) IN NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES #82 (TIE) IN BEST COLLEGES FOR VETERANS #83 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS #2 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES #116 (TIE) IN BEST UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING PROGRAMS

Established in 1867, Howard University is a federally chartered, private, doctoral research extensive university located in Washington, DC. With an enrollment of approximately 11,000 students in its undergraduate, graduate, professional, and joint degree programs, which span more than 120 areas of study within 13 schools and colleges, the University is dedicated to educating students from diverse backgrounds. Since its founding in 1867, Howard has awarded more than 120,000 degrees and certificates in the arts, the sciences, and the humanities. The University has an enduring commitment to the education and advancement of

underrepresented populations in America and the global community. Howard University’s unique mission represents an unwavering commitment to its core values of leadership, excellence, truth and service. WWW2.HOWARD.EDU BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

2400 SIXTH STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20059 (202) 806-6100

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HAMPTON UNIVERSITY IS RANKED #18 IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

Other universities simply teach history. Hampton University puts you right in the middle of it. Because, as you'll soon discover, you're not just a part of Hampton University - Hampton University is a part of you. While our roots reach deep into the history of this nation and the African-American experience, our sights – like yours – are set squarely on the horizons of the global community of the 21st century. Rich in history, steeped in tradition, Hampton University is a dynamic, progressive institution of higher education, providing a broad range of technical, liberal arts, and graduate degree programs. In addition to being one of the top historically black universities in the world, Hampton University is a tightly-knit community of learners and educators, representing 49 states and 35 territories and nations. Hampton University is nestled along the banks of the Virginia Peninsula, near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. The surrounding city of Hampton features a wide array of business and industrial enterprises, retail and residential areas, historical sites, and miles of waterfront and beaches. Attractions such as Fort Monroe, NASA Langley Research Center, and the Virginia Air and Space Center add to the splendor – and just plain fun – of the HU campus.

#18 (TIE) IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH

#13 (TIE) IN BEST COLLEGES FOR VETERANS

#3 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

#131 (TIE) IN ENGINEERING PROGRAMS (NO DOCTORATE)

WWW.HAMPTONU.EDU 100 E. QUEEN ST., HAMPTON, VA 23668 800.624.3328 - OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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The mission of Morehouse College is to develop men with disciplined minds who will lead lives of leadership and service. A private historically black liberal arts college for men, Morehouse realizes this mission by emphasizing the intellectual and character development of its students. In addition, the College assumes special responsibility for teaching the history and culture of black people. Founded in 1867 and located in Atlanta, Georgia, Morehouse is an academic community dedicated to teaching, scholarship, and service, and the continuing search for truth as a liberating force. As such, the College offers instructional programs in three divisions – business and economics, humanities and social sciences, and science and mathematics–– as well as extracurricular activities that: Develop skills in oral and written communications, analytical and critical thinking, and interpersonal relationships;

Foster an understanding and appreciation of world cultures, artistic and creative expression, and the nature of the physical universe; Promote understanding and appreciation of the specific knowledge and skills needed for the pursuit of professional careers and/or graduate study, and; Cultivate the personal attributes of self-confidence, tolerance, morality, ethical behavior, spirituality, humility, a global perspective, and a commitment to social justice. The College seeks students who are willing to carry the torch of excellence and who are willing to pay the price of gaining strength and confidence by confronting adversity, mastering their fears, and achieving success by earning it. In pursuit of its mission, v challenges itself to be among the very finest liberal arts institutions in the world.

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE IS RANKED #159 IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

#159 (TIE) IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES

#80 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS

#4 (TIE) IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

#248 (TIE) IN BUSINESS PROGRAMS

BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM 830 WESTVIEW DRIVE SW, ATLANTA, GA 30314 | (404) 681-2800 WWW.MOREHOUSE.EDU

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TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY IS AN INDEPENDENT AND STATE-RELATED INSTITUTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION. ITS PROGRAMS SERVE A STUDENT BODY THAT IS COEDUCATIONAL AS WELL AS RACIALLY, ETHNICALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY DIVERSE. WITH A STRONG ORIENTATION TOWARD DISCIPLINES WHICH HIGHLIGHT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EDUCATION AND WORK FORCE PREPARATION IN THE SCIENCES, PROFESSIONS AND TECHNICAL AREAS, TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY ALSO EMPHASIZES THE IMPORTANCE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS AS A FOUNDATION FOR SUCCESSFUL CAREERS IN ALL AREAS. ACCORDINGLY, ALL ACADEMIC MAJORS STRESS THE MASTERY OF A REQUIRED CORE OF LIBERAL ARTS COURSES. TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY WAS THE FIRST BLACK COLLEGE TO BE DESIGNATED AS A REGISTERED NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK (APRIL 2, 1966), AND THE ONLY BLACK COLLEGE TO BE DESIGNATED A NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE (OCTOBER 26, 1974), A DISTRICT ADMINISTERED BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE OF THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR. OVER THE PAST 135+ YEARS SINCE IT WAS FOUNDED BY BOOKER T. WASHINGTON IN 1881, TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY HAS BECOME ONE OF OUR NATION'S MOST OUTSTANDING INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING. WHILE IT FOCUSES ON HELPING TO DEVELOP HUMAN RESOURCES PRIMARILY WITHIN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY, IT IS OPEN TO ALL.

TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY IS RANKED #24 IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

#24 (TIE) IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH

#4 (TIE) IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

#326 (TIE) IN BUSINESS PROGRAMS

#183 (TIE) IN ENGINEERING PROGRAMS (DOCTORATE)

WWW.TUSKEGEE.EDU BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM 1200 W MONTGOMERY RD, TUSKEGEE, AL 36088 | (334) 727-8501

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XAVIER UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA IS RANKED #27 IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

#27 IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES SOUTH

#6 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

THERE ARE 106 HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND 251 CATHOLIC COLLEGES IN THE UNITED STATES, YET ONLY ONE IS BOTH BLACK AND CATHOLIC. THAT DISTINCTION BELONGS TO XAVIER UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA, WHICH STRIVES TO COMBINE THE BEST ATTRIBUTES OF BOTH ITS FAITH AND ITS CULTURE. XAVIER UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA, FOUNDED BY SAINT KATHARINE DREXEL AND THE SISTERS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT, IS CATHOLIC AND HISTORICALLY BLACK. THE ULTIMATE PURPOSE OF THE UNIVERSITY IS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROMOTION OF A MORE JUST AND HUMANE SOCIETY BY PREPARING ITS STUDENTS TO ASSUME ROLES OF LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY. THIS PREPARATION TAKES PLACE IN A DIVERSE LEARNING AND TEACHING ENVIRONMENT THAT INCORPORATES ALL RELEVANT EDUCATIONAL MEANS, INCLUDING RESEARCH AND COMMUNITY SERVICE. TEACHING ENVIRONMENT THAT INCORPORATES ALL RELEVANT EDUCATIONAL MEANS, INCLUDING RESEARCH AND COMMUNITY SERVICE.

1 DREXEL DRIVE, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70125 | (504) 486-7411 WWW.XULA.EDU BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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The University provides a student-centered environment consistent with its core values. The faculty is committed to educating students at the undergraduate, graduate, doctoral and professional levels, preparing graduates to apply their knowledge, critical thinking skills and creativity in their service to society. Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University holds the following values essential to the achievement of the university’s mission: Scholarship, Excellence, Openness, Fiscal Responsibility, Accountability, Collaboration, Diversity, Service, Fairness, Courage, Integrity, Respect, Collegiality, Freedom, Ethics, & Shared Governance

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University was founded as the State Normal College for Colored Students, and on October 3, 1887, it began classes with fifteen students and two instructors. Today, FAMU, as it has become affectionately known, is the premiere school among historically black colleges and universities. Prominently located on the highest hill in Florida’s capital city of Tallahassee, Florida A&M University remains the only historically black university in the eleven member State University System of Florida.

FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY IS RANKED RNP IN NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

RNP IN NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES

#173 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS

#7 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

#135 (TIE) IN ENGINEERING PROGRAMS (DOCTORATE)

LEE HALL, SUITE 400, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32307 | (850) 599-3000 WWW.FAMU.EDU BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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FISK UNIVERSITY IS RANKED #171 IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES.

SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR

PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

#171 (TIE) IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES

WWW.FISK.EDU 1000 17TH AVENUE N, NASHVILLE, TN 37208 | (615) 329-8500

#106 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS

Founded in 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War, Fisk University is a historically black university, and is the oldest institution of higher learning in Nashville, Tennessee. Fisk’s outstanding faculty and students continue to enhance the University’s national reputation for academic excellence, which is validated year after year by the leading third party reviewers, as well as, by the pool of talented applicants and the large percentage of alumni who complete graduate or professional degrees and become leaders and scholars in their fields. From its earliest days, Fisk has played a leadership role in the education of African-Americans. Fisk faculty and alumni have been among America's intellectual, artistic, and civic leaders in every generation since the University's beginnings. Fisk University produces graduates from diverse backgrounds with the integrity and intellect required for substantive contributions to society. Our curriculum is grounded in the liberal arts. Our faculty and administrators emphasize the discovery and advancement of knowledge through research in the natural and social sciences, business and the humanities. We are committed to the success of scholars and leaders with global perspectives.

#8 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

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THE WORLD NEEDS VISIONARIES. THOSE WHO ARE ABLE TO IMAGINE WHAT’S POSSIBLE AND CHART A COURSE TO GET THERE. NEARLY 150 YEARS AGO, CLAFLIN BROKE DOWN BARRIERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION, MAKING IT THE FIRST SOUTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY OPEN TO ALL REGARDLESS OF RACE. TODAY, CLAFLIN CONTINUES TO WELCOME EXEMPLARY STUDENTS OF ALL RACES AND GENDERS WHO DEMONSTRATE A PASSION TO CHANGE NOT ONLY THEIR OWN CIRCUMSTANCES, BUT TO CHANGE THE WORLD AS WELL. WE BELIEVE THAT MOST LEADERS ARE MADE, NOT BORN. FURTHERMORE, WE BELIEVE THAT STUDENTS WITH PASSION, INTEGRITY AND A WILLINGNESS TO WORK HARD HAVE AN INNATE CAPACITY TO BECOME VISIONARY LEADERS. AS A CLAFLIN STUDENT, YOU BE CHALLENGED TO REALIZE YOUR FULL POTENTIAL, LEAVING HERE WITH AN UNPARALLELED EDUCATION THAT WILL SERVE YOU WELL IN GRADUATE SCHOOL, IN A CAREER – AND IN LIFE.

CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY IS RANKED RNP IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

RNP IN NATIONAL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES

#192 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS

#9 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

WWW.CLAFLIN.EDU 400 MAGNOLIA STREET, ORANGEBURG, SC 29115 | (803) 535-5000

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FROM OUR ROOTS AS AN 1890 LAND-GRANT UNIVERSITY, WE HAVE EXPANDED AND ADAPTED TO BECOME A SCHOOL FIT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY AND BEYOND. N.C. A&T STILL HAS AWARD-WINNING FACULTY, INTENSIVE RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND COMMUNITY-FOCUSED INITIATIVES — BUT NOW OUR CAMPUS IS MORE DIVERSE, OUR CURRICULUM INCLUDES NANOENGINEERING AND OUR IDEA OF PUBLIC SERVICE ENCOMPASSES NOT ONLY GREENSBORO, BUT THE WORLD. WE BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF OUR STUDENTS TO SOLVE PROBLEMS, BOTH LOCAL AND GLOBAL, THROUGH TECHNOLOGY, BUSINESS, ENGINEERING, THE ARTS AND OTHER ENDEAVORS. WE BELIEVE THAT THROUGH EXEMPLARY INSTRUCTION AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES, THROUGH SCHOLARLY AND CREATIVE RESEARCH, AND THROUGH COURAGE AND COMMUNITY SERVICE, N.C. A&T PREPARES STUDENTS TO ENHANCE THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THEMSELVES, THE CITIZENS OF NORTH CAROLINA, THE NATION, AND THE WORLD.

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY IS RANKED RNP IN

NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES. SCHOOLS ARE RANKED ACCORDING TO THEIR PERFORMANCE ACROSS A SET OF WIDELY ACCEPTED INDICATORS OF EXCELLENCE.

RNP IN NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES

#247 (TIE) IN HIGH SCHOOL COUNSELOR RANKINGS

#10 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

#425 (TIE) IN BUSINESS PROGRAMS

#135 (TIE) IN ENGINEERING PROGRAMS (DOCTORATE)

WWW.NCAT.EDU (336) 334-7500 1601 E. MARKET STREET, GREENSBORO, NC 27411 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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BEST COLLEGES RANKINGS #299-#391 IN NATIONAL UNIVERSITIES #12 IN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES #156-#209 IN TOP PUBLIC SCHOOLS Morgan State University is a public institution that was founded in 1867. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 6,270 (fall 2020), its setting is urban, and the campus size is 175 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar.

WWW.MORGAN.EDU 1700 E Cold Spring Ln, Baltimore, MD 21251 | 443.885.3333 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

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BEST COLLEGES RANKINGS #131-#171 IN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES NORTH #82 IN TOP PERFORMERS ON SOCIAL MOBILITY #47-#61 IN TOP PUBLIC SCHOOLS Coppin State University is a public institution that was founded in 1900. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 2,108 (fall 2020), its setting is urban, and the campus size is 38 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar.

12 WWW.COPPIN.EDU 410.951.3000 45

2500 W North Ave, Baltimore, MD 21216 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: WWW.USNEWS.COM

College Completion TOP 10 HBCUS BY GRADUATION RATE College graduation rates offer valuable information for the prospective student. They indicate how many students enrolled at a particular college actually graduate from that college. While low college graduation rates aren’t necessarily a negative sign, students often want to surround themselves with like-minded individuals who are dedicated to obtaining a degree from their chosen school. For these students, choosing a school with high graduation rates is an excellent step. The following are 10 HBCUs with the highest college graduation rates based on the latest available data.

10.

Claflin University Orangeburg, South Carolina Claflin is a smaller, private college offering Bachelors and Masters degrees. They graduate 44% of students.

9.

7.

Jackson State University Jackson, Mississippi Jackson State offers Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral degrees. They are located in a city setting on a midsize campus and have a graduation rate of 45%.

Xavier University of Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Located in the heart of New Orleans, Xavier University offers Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral degrees. Xavier’s graduation rate is also 51%.

8.

Tuskegee University Tuskegee, Alabama Tuskegee University is located in a town setting on a distant campus. They offer Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral degrees and have a graduation rate of 46%.

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